Going Blue

Brandywine Valley Baseball Colon Cancer Awareness

In 2004, BV was formed to provide boys who loved baseball an opportunity to play competitive baseball regardless of their ability to pay. BV is able to provide this opportunity by keeping costs down through minimized expenses, volunteer positions in lieu of paid staff and, most importantly, fundraising. The original colors of BV were black, silver and white and remained that way until 2013. In the late fall season of 2013 blue was added to remember and honor two great men who lost their courageous battle with colon cancer that fall.

Mike Dolceamore and Steve Santoleri.

The organization now is committed to promoting colon cancer awareness and added a blue ribbon on the BV hats and started a scholarship in their names to provide partial and or full funding to a family in need beginning in the spring of 2014. The grants will be awarded semi-annually and selection will be based on need with a preference to someone who has been affected by colon cancer or another life threatening illness.

Our expanded mission is to knock colon cancer out of the top three cancer killers. We are doing this by championing prevention, Prevention:

Screening is the number one way you can reduce your risk for this unique cancer. While screening is the most important step you can take – it’s not the only one. You can take charge of your health by knowing your family history and possible risk factors, eating a balanced diet, exercising, limiting alcohol use and not smoking. Together, this is a cancer we can do something about.

Facts:

– Third most common cancer in the United States.
– Second leading cause of cancer death.
– One of the most detectable and treatable cancers.
– Over 90% of cases can be prevented with recommended screening.
– 30,000 lives can be saved each year with recommended screening.

Colon cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in men and women combined in the US. The American Cancer Society estimates that 142,820 people will be diagnosed in 2013 and that 50,830 will die from colon cancer in the United States. On average, the lifetime risk of developing colon cancer is about one in 20 (5%), however, this varies widely according to individual risk factors. About 72% of cases arise in the colon and about 28% in the rectum. Early Detection With regular screening, colon cancer can be found early, when treatment is most effective. In many cases, screening can prevent colon cancer by finding and removing polyps before they become cancer. And if cancer is present, earlier detection means a chance at a longer life — generally, five-year survival rates for colon cancer are lower the further advanced the disease is at detection: • Over 90% of those diagnosed when the cancer is found at a local stage (confined to colon or rectum) survive more than five years. • Once the cancer is diagnosed at a regional stage (spread to surrounding tissue) that rate drops to 69%. • When the cancer has also spread to distant sites, only 12% of those diagnosed will reach the five-year survival milestone. Stage at Diagnosis Unfortunately, the majority of colon cancers are not found early (before it has spread): • 39% of colon cancers are found while the cancer is found at a local stage (confined to colon or rectum). • 37% of colon cancers are found after the cancer is diagnosed at a regional stage (spread to surrounding tissue). • 20% of colon cancers are found after the disease has spread to distant organs. Colon Cancer and Age • 90% of new cases and 95% of deaths from colon cancer occur in people 50 or older.

However, colon cancer does not discriminate and can happen to men and women at any age. • While rates for colon cancer in adults 50 and older have been declining, incidence rates in adults younger than 50 years has been increasing. Colon Cancer and Ethnicity and Race • Jews of Eastern European descent (Ashkenazi Jews) may have a higher rate of colon cancer. • Partly because of disproportionate screening, African-American men and women have a higher risk of developing colon cancer and a lower survival rate (about 20% higher incidence rate and 45% higher mortality rate) compared to Caucasians, Asians, Hispanics and Native Americans. • The risk of death is also increased for Native Americans and Alaskan Natives. Colon Cancer and Family History • People with a first-degree relative (parent, sibling, or children) who has colon cancer are between two and three times the risk of developing the cancer than those without a family history. Colon Cancer Survival Rates Since the mid-1980s, the colon cancer death rate has been dropping due in part to increased awareness and screening. By finding more polyps and cancer in the earlier (local and regional) stages, it is easiest to treat. Improved treatment options have also contributed to a rise in survival rates. • You can help ensure that colon cancer stays on our nation’s agenda by becoming an advocate. In the past ten years, radical developments in drugs and chemotherapy agents have emerged. Despite this progress, there are still barriers to screening and many people lack access to effective treatment and care. Join us in telling Congress that it is unacceptable that 40,000 people continue to die from this preventable disease every year. Make your voice heard – we deserve to live in a world free of colon cancer! Screening Can Reduce Your Risk! Early detection is vital — over 90% of all cases of colon cancer can be prevented with recommended screening. Despite its high incidence, colon cancer is one of the most detectable and, if found early enough, most treatable forms of cancer. If you’re 50 or older, getting a screening test for colon cancer could save your life. Here’s how: Colon cancer usually starts from polyps in the colon or rectum. A polyp is a growth that shouldn’t be there. • Over time, some polyps can turn into cancer. • Screening tests can find polyps, so they can be removed before they turn into cancer. • Screening tests can also find colon cancer early. When it is found early, the chance of being cured is good.

Professional guidelines emphasize the importance of a regular screening program that includes annual fecal occult blood tests (FOBT), periodic partial or full colon exams, or both. Leaders in the field have estimated that, with widespread adoption of these screening practices, as many as 30,000 lives could be saved each year. Colorectal cancer, or colon cancer, occurs in the colon or rectum. It is the third most common cancer in the United States, behind only lung and prostate cancers in men and lung and breast cancers in women, and the second leading cause of cancer death. In fact, it is estimated that in 2013, 50,830 people will die of colon cancer. But the truth is: it doesn’t have to be this way. If everyone 50 years or older had a regular screening test, as many as 80% of deaths from colon cancer could be prevented. Colon cancer screening saves lives. Screening detects precancerous polyps and allows them to be removed before turning into cancer. Screening also helps find colon cancer at an early stage, when treatment often leads to a cure. So please, take control of your life and your health – if you’re turning 50 or are experiencing abnormal symptoms, GET SCREENED. And urge those you love to do the same.

How You Can Help Us Spread Awareness

Line Up Cards

$250

Company name and logo printed on our team line up cards shared with opponents in over 400 games.

Mascot Jersey

$500

Have your name and logo printed on our mascot’s jersey that attends most of our games.

Awareness Brochure

$500

Become the official sponsor of the BV awareness brochure for Colon Cancer that reaches thousands of friends of BV.

Campaign on Constant Contact

$500

Become the official sponsor of the BV awareness campaign over the internet, reaching out to all of BV sports teams, coaches and friends of BV.
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Wristbands

$500

Have your company name listed as a sponsor on 4000 colon cancer awareness wristbands which will be made available to all our friends and family.

Hats

$750

BV is getting new hats with the Blue Colon Cancer Ribbon. Become the official sponsor and include your name on the outfield sign indicating your support.

Flag

$750

Company name and logo printed on the Colon Cancer Awareness flag that flies above our home field during all of our baseball games.

Travel Banner

$1000

Have your name printed on our team banner that follows us to every game we play throughout the year.
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BV TV Advertisement

$5000

Become the official sponsor of our BV Baseball Organization TV advertisements getting the word out to thousands in the surrounding area.

Scoreboard

$1500

2×8 sign with your company name and logo highlighting your support for our Colon Cancer awareness campaign. The sign will be seen by over 600 participants, their friends and family, and spectators to over 250 games from late March until mid-November.

Steve and Mike Scholarship

Varies

Full or partial scholarship in memory of Steve and Mike to benefit young athletes based on combination of need with preference to someone who has been affected by colon cancer or another life threatening illness

Benefits to Sponsors

– Helping to raise the awareness of Colon Cancer.
– Associating your company with our campaign to raise the awareness of Colon Cancer and to knock it out of the top three cancer killers.
– Reach over six hundred players and families, thousands of “Friends of BV” and thousands more that we will reach through our awareness campaign.
– Public recognition of your support.
– Reach thousands of potential customers with your company name and logo on the Going Blue section of our website and our Quarterly Going Blue newsletter.

Click Here To Become a Going Blue Sponsor